Pym

Pym by Mat Johnson gets a little weird. To the credit of the story it warns us right out of the gates, in the preface, that it’s going to get a little weird. Anyone who has read The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket by Edgar Allen Poe will pick up on the similarities, and purposeful differences, between the two stories immediately. If you haven’t read The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, don’t worry about it. You will be told, in no uncertain terms, throughout Pym what to be looking for and thinking about in relation to The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (Can we take a moment and all agree that Poe did a terrible job naming his book?).

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The catalyst of the story is the main character Chris Jaynes doesn’t get tenure. He uses this situation to further his obsession with Dirk Peters, the black man that traveled with Pym in The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket. This obsession culminates in Jaynes bringing together a crew to follow the path of Pym and Peters to Antarctica. What follows is structurally a very similar story to The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket with the race roles reversed. Instead of finding the black inhabitants that Poe described they found giant white creatures who they call “Snow Honkies”.

The book reads as a sort of parody of The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym at the same time as satirizing the use of the slave narrative as the primary method of articulating African American history and artistic expression. A point that is made several times throughout the story is that when telling and/or living (as is the case, eventually with the characters in Pym) a story that is a slave narrative the story is forced into the confines of the system of white and black that was used to justify slavery to begin with.

That all sounds rather serious, I know, and the book certainly has serious, and relevant, points to make. Don’t mistake serious points for a sad book! This book is funny and soaked in irony. I highly recommend it if you’d like a fresh and entertaining critique of racial politics and identity.

Commonplace Book Entries

“In this age when reality is built on big lies, what better place for truth than fiction?”

Pym by Mat Johnson

“Nobody wants to give a job for life to an asshole.”

Pym by Mat Johnson

“It was depressing looking at every extra pound on him, each a reminder that we were both moving swiftly into decline with little else as accomplishment.”

Pym by Mat Johnson

The constantly rustling wind didn’t help. That was just the sound of silence moving.”

Pym by Mat Johnson

“’Goddamn global warming.’ Garth leaned forward to get a better view. ‘Ain’t our fault. It was all them Escalades in the ghetto.’”

Pym by Mat Johnson

Keep reading. Keep learning. Keep listening. Keep creating.

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