Shades of Milk and Honey

Every once in a while, I’ll accidentally leave the book I’m reading at a friend’s house and pick a new one at random that turns out to be exactly what my readerly heart needed. Such was the case with Shades of Milk and Honey by Mary Robinette Kowal. It’s been a couple of years since I last picked up a book in the style of Jane Austen, and Mary Robinette Kowal certainly fits that bill with the happy addition of magic. This, for me, was a stay up till two in the morning to finish it type of book. Thank goodness I’m on Spring Break.

Shades-of-Milk-and-Honey-by-Mary-Robinette-Kowal

The magic in the world of Shades of Milk and Honey is called glamour and it is considered a skill for well accomplished women on par with piano playing. Our heroine, Jane Ellsworth, is particularly skilled with glamour and adheres to the social expectations and rules for a young, eligible, woman. A lot of this story is setting up and explaining the social structure; and rightfully so, as that structure is forefront in the life of Jane. There is also significant time spent discussing the artistry that goes into glamour and those were my favorite moments. I can see the potential for so many other stories in this world utilizing glamour for more than art and other homely uses. I do believe there is at least one more book in this world and I look forward to see where Mary Robinette Kowel goes with it.

This isn’t to say the glamour aspects of this story aren’t interesting; they just aren’t really the point of the story. The Ellsworth sisters need to get husbands and being good at glamour is one more skill on the list that could attract a good husband. This is where I struggled a bit while reading. It’s the same thing when reading Jane Austen and all of the Bronte’s. I appreciate the story and I understand the confines of the world, but holy Toledo do I ever resent the confines of the world. For the most part the heroines of these stories resent those confines too, so I can be their cheerleader as fight the patriarchy. The fight, however, is not nearly far enough removed from reality for me to not be rage reading occasionally. By the end of this story Jane’s situation has changed in a rather dramatic and exciting way, and I can’t wait to see what opportunities may open up for her in the next story by Mary Robinette Kowel.

Keep reading. Keep learning. Keep listening. Keep creating.

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